Developing Workforce Development Strategies

Friday December 2nd, 2016 at 10:00am
Written by Ed Quintavalle - Senior Consultant

A man is in a hot air balloon that is slowly losing altitude. He ends up hovering over the side of the road in the desert. Another man happens by. The man in the balloon calls down to him, "Sir, could you tell me where I am?" The man looks up, assesses the situation, and responds: "Yes, you are about 30 feet in the air on the side of the road in the desert." The man in the balloon, unamused at the response, calls down, "Thanks Einstein ... you must be a workforce development consultant." "What do you mean?" responds the other man. "You just told me everything that I already knew and were no help whatsoever." The fella looks up at the man in the balloon and says, "I would guess that you work for a company that’s in serious trouble." "Why do you say that?" responds the man in the balloon. "Because you have no idea where you are, no idea where you are going, and no idea how to get there from here."

This is a somewhat humorous anecdote for the application of Workforce Development (WD) strategies. I wouldn’t say that WD consultants only reveal everything that employers already know; nor are employers always totally in the dark about their plight. However, when information is qualified through a data-driven analysis, it usually comes as no big surprise for employers where their weakest workforce links are located. Lack of training (critical skills and basic skills) often haunt a company until data is presented that validates what many already suspected.

Continue Reading


5 Tips for Keeping a Job

Tuesday November 1st, 2016 at 7:09am
Written by Ed Quintavalle - Senior Consultant

Finding a job doesn’t always come easy, especially in today’s competitive job market. It can also be difficult to decide on a career. In fact, most of us never stop asking ourselves that age-old question: “What do I want to be when I grow up?”

With so many resources available, job searches aren’t just about the classifieds anymore. Jobseekers must use every resource possible to widen their job search: networking, social media, recruiters, job listings and employer contacts from workforce agencies.

State and local workforce agencies offer full-service, one-stop assistance with skill assessments, training, job counseling and job placement. Many non-profits also provide services. These organizations often offer assistance for those who need to overcome specific barriers to employment. Ultimately, what kind of job you decide is best for you depends a lot on who you are, and your satisfaction on the job. It pays to map out career goals and aspirations, and figure out exactly what steps are needed to get the job you want, because you really can make it happen!

Continue Reading


Education and Workforce Development Partnerships

Monday October 3rd, 2016 at 10:00am
Written by Ed Quintavalle - Senior Consultant

There’s been a national call-to-action for two-year community colleges and career and technical high schools. Ultimately, educators are responsible for meeting the demand for skills in the global economy.

  1. There is consensus that the foundational academic knowledge needed for postsecondary education and for careers is virtually the same, with growing recognition that academic skills, employability and technical knowledge and skills are essential as well.
  2. We’re seeing widespread agreement that lifelong learning and ‘learning how to learn’ are key drivers of success in college, careers and civic life.
  3. Research shows collaborative efforts in states, districts and communities to strengthen their collective capacity to deliver results that matter.

The plan is for greater student success. It needs to be bolder and broader – “cradle-to-career” strategies – comprehensive, data-driven plans that begin early on and focus on improving measurable progress to career readiness. This new formula shows the most promise for success. Follow-up on the student’s outcome is also important to obtain the metrics to grow this philosophy.

Continue Reading


Construction Training and Internship Program for Detroit Students

Wednesday August 24th, 2016 at 7:12am
Written by Michelle Knierim - Associate Consultant

Over the past 3 years, The Construction Association of Michigan (CAM) has been approached by several of its member companies about the lack of young people entering the construction industry. During a series of roundtable discussions, workforce development continued to be a trending topic. To address this growing concern, CAM joined forces with EDSI to develop a pilot program called “3D.” 3D stands for develop, design and deliver.

EDSI just completed the first 3D boot camp training at the UAW Ford building in Detroit, Michigan. The training was a 5 day training that taught juniors in high school more about the construction industry. They learned about careers in the industry, workplace readiness skills, communication, construction terminology and overview, the construction process (development, design, bidding, pre-construction, close out), money management and basic finance, technology in the construction industry and safety requirements. We partnered with 6 different schools throughout the city of Detroit to include both charter and public schools.

Continue Reading


Hiring Ex-Offenders Can Be a Smart Business Decision

Monday August 22nd, 2016 at 10:00am
Written by Ray Eibel - Director of New Business Development

Over the years, I have had numerous opportunities to present workshops on employment of ex-offenders. As I stand in front of the audience, I am always amazed at the shock on people’s faces when we discuss the sheer number of the population in prisons and jails, and the costs associated with incarceration. For example, did you know:

  • Over 80 billion dollars is spent on Corrections each year - Bureau of Justice Statistics
  • Seven million people are under correctional control, including individuals on probation and parole – U. S. Department of Justice
  • The United States has less than 5 percent of the world's population, but it has almost a quarter of the world's prisoners – New York Times
  • 1 out of 100 adults in the United States is in prison.
  • Once released from prison, 2 out of 3 people are rearrested within a year. This is known as recidivism.
  • Over the course of the last 20 years, the amount of money spent on prisons increased by 570%, while the money spent on education increased by only 33%.
  • The cost per year to house an inmate varies from state to state. For example, in New York the cost is $47,421 per year, while in Pennsylvania, it is $42,339.

Needless to say, the above statistics clearly point out that we are facing enormous challenges. The costs associated with incarceration are staggering and the population of prisoners who will eventually be released and in need of jobs is becoming enormous.

Continue Reading


Workforce Development in the Public Transportation Industry

Wednesday July 13th, 2016 at 12:10pm
Written by Ken Mall - Managing Director

Every day millions of people travel from one place to another using buses, trains, subways, ferries or other forms of public transportation. The larger the city or urban area, the more likely that public transportation is a major driver of the economy and the primary way for a significant portion of the population to get to jobs. Most people don’t realize the agencies that run public transit organizations are in desperate need of new workers to operate and maintain the current transit systems and build new systems to meet the growing demand for transportation options.

Over the next decade, it is estimated that more than 1 million workers will be needed just to replace the workers who retire. The transit industry is also experiencing a technological evolution. Buses and rail cars are able to troubleshoot themselves and send messages to technicians to let them know about potential problems. Computers are now the primary tool in a mechanic’s tool box.

Continue Reading


COABE 2016 - Reflections from an Adult Education Professional Developer

Wednesday June 29th, 2016 at 8:18am
Written by Kimberly Glenn - Director

This is my fourth year attending the yearly conference run by The Commission on Adult Basic Education and every year my involvement has grown. My first year I was just an attendee, but the next year I presented once, last year I presented twice, and this year I presented a total of four times! The conference reflected the changes and needs of the Adult Education community and it was amazing to see the growth in adult education during this time.

Major themes this year were transitions and career pathways. With the WIOA legislation this idea of preparing students for their next step has become extremely important. Workshop after workshop addressed various aspects of contextualized instruction, career counseling, transitions and career pathways. It was amazing to not only see how eager adult education professionals are about the change, but the vast differences that exist in how the implementation is occurring. There are many different approaches based on population, geography, integrated service options and program structure. I was inspired and motivated by the enthusiasm of the professionals who attended my session “Building Bigger and Better Career Counseling Programs in Adult Education,” and I am so happy that they left the workshop with concrete steps to assist them in implementing strategies for success.

Continue Reading


Addressing the Skill Shortage

Thursday June 16th, 2016 at 8:30am
Written by Kevin Watson - Director of Business Development

My wife and I are currently in full-on nesting mode as we prepare for the arrival of our second child. Throughout this nesting process, I have had the chance to reflect on the twenty months that have passed since our first son, Alexander, was born.

If I am being honest with myself, I was terribly inefficient at so many things during those first few months after our son was born. Everything from changing a diaper, to installing a car seat, to setting up and breaking down a pack-and-play took WAY longer than it does today. So what changed? Practice, practice, practice.

Luckily for me (and probably 95% of new parents), you don’t have to pass an interview or a test to get the job.

Continue Reading


Tips for Building Solid Relationships, from the Wand of the Fairy Job Mother

Wednesday April 27th, 2016 at 8:01am
Written by Kathleen Niedermayer - Job Developer

“Rapport is the ability to enter someone else’s world, to make him feel that you understand him, that you have a strong common bond.” - Tony Robbins, Author and Motivational Speaker

Building relationships with another person is all about connecting with him or her and creating a sense of trust and understanding. According to some research, we have only 7 seconds to make a good first impression! It is absolutely essential for us to build solid connections with our clients, and this relationship building starts the first time we meet.

When I began my career as a Job Developer with EDSI, I would conduct an initial interview with clients. I would ask questions about clients’ living situation, their children and partners, the kinds of jobs they had in the past and what they wanted to accomplish. The interview gave me some important facts, but I realized something was missing. I wanted to go a bit deeper, I needed to better understand their passions, hopes and dreams when it came to finding, obtaining and keeping a job.

Continue Reading


Five Concerns of the 50+ Client

Wednesday January 13th, 2016 at 7:30am
Written by Kathleen Niedermayer - Job Developer

In my short tenure with EDSI as an EARN Job Developer, I have had the privilege of observing and teaching Job Club. Most of the clients who participate are 50 years old+, have been employed steadily in a company or industry for a long time, and generally have no clue about the requirements of a job search in this century.

Five common concerns usually come to light during our weeks together in Job Club. The exciting news for us is that with empathy, active listening and open sharing, most of these concerns can be identified and relieved before “graduation” day. You can be the change agent that turns their fear, frustration and negative attitude into one of hope for a brighter and better new day.

Continue Reading


Designing Career Pathways within WIOA Guidelines

Tuesday December 15th, 2015 at 9:45am
Written by Terri Kaufman - Workforce Development Specialist

WIOA requires states and local Workforce Development Boards to work with adult education, post-secondary education and other community-based organizations to develop career pathways that will make it easier for all Americans to attain the skills and credentials needed for jobs.

What are career pathways? The US Department of Labor defines career pathways as a new way of doing business which operates at both a systems and an individual level. At the systems level, a career pathway is a broad approach for serving populations that may experience significant barriers to employment. The career pathway can substantively alter the way the workforce system delivers its services and the system’s relationship with partner organizations and stakeholders to better prepare the worker.

Career pathway programs should offer a sequence of education courses and training credentials which are aligned with work-ready standards and competencies which are validated by employers. Career pathways can also provide greater customer service at all levels by engaging employers, adult basic education, training providers, community organizations and service providers to design services that meet the needs of employers and job seekers.

Continue Reading


WIOA - Eligible Training Provider List Requirements

Thursday October 22nd, 2015 at 8:01am

Written by Terri Kaufman - Workforce Development Specialist with EDSI

tkaufman@edsisolutions.com

 

WIOA provides Local Workforce Development Boards (LWDBs) the opportunity to expand training and educational opportunities.  The goal is to help low income individuals, dislocated workers, individuals with limited skills and barriers to employment, and youth earn industry-recognized credentials and advance in the workplace.

LWDBs now can offer more training specifically targeted for high-demand occupations or industry sectors in addition to Individual Training Accounts (ITAs).  Local WDBs can now use WIOA funds to provide new training models that will lead to: 

  • industry-recognized credentials 
  • apprenticeships
  • integrated educational/training approaches 
  • career pathways 
  • industry partnerships
  • cohort-based training

LWDBs can now use a portion of their local Title I funds for pay-for-performance contracts for specific targeted populations.  They will be required to evaluate how each targeted population was selected, along with outcomes of training.

 

Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) Requirements

WIOA has established an Eligible Training Provider process that will help support and ensure customer choice, performance accountability and continuous improvement.  States and LWDBs will identify Eligible Training Providers qualified to receive WIOA funds to train adult/dislocated workers and youth. 

 

An Eligible Training Provider is one who has met the eligibility requirements to receive WIOA Title Adult and Dislocated Worker funds to provide training services to eligible individuals.  In order to receive WIOA funds, the training provider must meet numerous ETPL numerous requirements and must be:

  1. Institutions of higher education that provide training that leads to post-secondary credentials
  2. Apprenticeship programs registered by the USDOL Office of Registered Apprenticeship
  3. Public or private training providers, including joint labor-management organizations, pre-apprenticeship programs and occupational/technical training providers
  4. Providers of adult education and literacy activities 

All training providers will be required to meet performance outcomes and ensure accountability, quality, and labor market-relevant programs and offerings. 

 

Training providers (both existing and new) will be required to submit an online application that includes all the documentation required by the states and LWDBs such as:

  • Information supporting a claim that an applicable training program leads to a post-secondary or industry-recognized credential, and a detailed description of the credential
  • Evidence of ability to provide services to incumbent workers and individuals with barriers to employment
  • Evidence of state licensure requirements and licensing status 
  • Program completion rate for all individuals participating in applicable programs
  • Employment and earning outcomes 
  • Cost of training (including supplies, books, fees)
  • Post-secondary credentials offered
  • Program costs per student by type of training 
  • Pre-Apprenticeship Program offerings

 

Training providers on the ETPL will also be required to report performance outcomes.  Each year they will be required to submit, at a minimum, the following:

  • Total number of participants enrolled in the program
  • Total number of participants completing the program
  • Entry into unsubsidized employment at second quarter after exit
  • Entry into unsubsidized employment at fourth quarter after exit
  • Median earnings
  • Attainment of post-secondary credentials
  • Measurable skills gains
  • Effectiveness in serving employers

All LWDBs are required to have training providers on the approved ETPL that are offering training programs aligned with their state and region in-demand occupations and sectors. They will be required to ensure training providers make all the above information available to their One-Stop Centers so eligible clients can make informed decisions on training offerings. They will be required to report performance and outcomes on training offerings, while ensuring individuals with barriers to employment are served.


Is your LWDB ready to review and advance training provider course offerings?  How are you going to determine if training is meeting the needs of in-demand occupations and sectors?  What steps are you taking to ensure that training services are meeting the requirements of WIOA?  We are here to help you.

If you are interested in gaining more information regarding WIOA implementation, please contact me at tkaufman@edsisolutions.com

Click here for more info about WIOA on our website. 

 

WIOA - The Role of Local WIBs in Career Pathways Development

Tuesday September 29th, 2015 at 7:40am

Written by Terri Kaufman - Workforce Development Specialist with EDSI

tkaufman@edsisolutions.com

 

WIOA requires Local Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs) to work with representatives from secondary and postsecondary education providers to develop and implement Career Pathways. This occurs by aligning employment, training, education and supportive services to meet the needs of adults and youth, focusing on those with barriers to employment.

What is a Career Pathway?

The National Career Pathways Network has defined a Career Pathway as a coherent, articulated sequence of rigorous academic and career/technical courses, commencing in ninth grade and leading to an Associate’s degree, Baccalaureate degree and beyond, an industry-recognized certificate and/or licensure. The Career Pathway is developed, implemented, and maintained in partnership with secondary and postsecondary education providers and employers.

Why Career Pathways?

Career Pathways can help Local WIBs, educators, jobseekers, youth and employers identify career options and the knowledge and skill requirements that individuals need for their careers. Career Pathways also help in identifying skill sets and job functions/roles needed across job families.  

Local WIBs need to be committed to working with educators, industries and economic development partners to develop a shared vision and strategy to support sector-based Career Pathways for youth and adults.

Career Pathways Strategies

There are many strategies that Local WIBS can use to support the development of Career Pathways:

  • Working with employers to determine their hiring needs
  • Working with educators to design training programs that meet the hiring needs of employers
  • Utilizing labor market data (local, state and national)
  • Measuring the success of existing training programs and outcomes
  • Measuring employer and earnings outcomes
  • Promoting seamless progress from one education step to another
  • Eliminating barriers to accessing training
  • Providing guidance through career coaching
  • Creating and supporting partnerships between workforce development, education, labor and non-profit organizations 
  • Supporting industry partnerships

What steps are you taking to ensure that your education and training providers, operators and partners are supporting Career Pathway services as required in WIOA? Do you need help getting started or help in completing the processes? Please let us know how we can assist you in your efforts.

If you are interested in gaining more information regarding WIOA implementation, please contact me at tkaufman@edsisolutions.com

Click here for more info about WIOA on our website. 

Founded in 1979, EDSI is a national leader in workforce development, customized training and consulting.

Want one of our experts to contact you to listen to your needs and demonstrate how we can help?

Tags

Workforce Development (65), HR (52), Inspiration (37), Planning (35), Training (24), Culture (22), Goals (21), Education (21), WIOA (21), Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (20), Setting Goals (18), Career Services (18), Talent (18), Values (15), Success Story (14), Growth (14), Career Pathways (13), Customized Training (13), Knowledge Retention (13), Conference (12), Professional Development (12), Strategy (12), Job Task Analysis (11), Support (10), Attracting Talent (10), Adult Education (10), Succession Planning (10), Motivation (9), Youth (9), Operational Improvement (9), Recruitment (9), Talent Development (9), Mentoring (8), Knowledge Management (8), Retaining Talent (8), Restructuring (7), Skills Gap (5), Skilled Talent (5), Process (5), Manufacturing (4), Talent Engagement (4), Financial (4), Building Relationships (4), Internship (3), Young Professional (3), Community Service (3), Turnaround Plan (3), Leadership Development (3), Cash Forecasting (3), Baby Boomers (2), TEGL (2), Sales Lessons (2), 6σ Black Belt (2), EDSI History (2), Industry Partnerships (2), One-Stop Center (2), Memorandums of Understanding (2), Employer Engagement (2), On-the-Job Training (1), Transitions (1), Lockout Tagout (1), Safety (1), Transit (1), Ex-Offender (1), COABE (1), Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs (1), Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (1), Awards (1), WIA (1), Manpower Development and Training Act (1), Job Training Partnership Act (1), Retention (1), Transitional Jobs (1), Leadership (1), EARN (1), Learning (1), Priority of Services (1), CAM (1), Theory of Constraints (1), Skill Gaps (1), Cycle Counting (1), Inventory (1), ISO (1), Onboarding (1), Health and Human Services (1), Project Management (1), 35 Year Anniversary (1), Diversification (1), Community Based Organizations (1), ISPI (1), Golden Circle (1), Lending (1), ABL (1), Webb's Depth of Knowledge (1), Instructional Design (1), Economy (1), Recession (1), Change Management (1), SMART Goals (1), Skills Balance Sheet (1), Resume Writing (1)

Show more
Human Resources Today

Using the process laid out by EDSI helped us to create the right gatekeeper responsibilities and tasks, so we can ultimately focus more on the fit of candidates to the Cornerstone culture. Tom Willis; CEO - Cornerstone Charter Schools

Message sent! Thank you for your feedback.

Message sent! Thank you for your feedback.

Feedback

Please let us know what you
think of our website!

 
Not good Great
Content:
Navigation:
Design:

Additional Comments